Tag Archives: Flying Circus

Monty Python: The funniest sketches (part 3)

Nudge Nudge

Nudge Nudge was originally written by Idle as a script for Ronnie Barker that was rejected but it finally saw the light of day in the Flying Circus’ third episode. Performed by its own writer and Jones, the skit witness two strangers in a pub entering into a conversation that one of them finds cryptic and later uncomfortably intrusive. Riffing off British repressiveness as well as our love for complex double entendres, the stretch is all about the hilariously enthusiastic delivery of Idle as a sex-obsessed bachelor.

Nudge Nudge, stuffed with slang references, is an exercise in convoluted sexual innuendo as the relentless barrage of wink-wink of the bachelor, say-no-more proclamations drives the stiff-upper-lipped pub-goer of Jones to distraction. Finally getting the single man to plainly speak and ask Jones’ character if he has slept with a lady, the sketch is one of the few Python routines that end with a clear punchline as the bachelor pauses for a few seconds before asking: “What’s it like?”

Spam

Stupendously daft even by Python standards, Spam combines a greasy spoon of coffee setting, the titular canned meat, Vikings and a British historian into a sketch which shouldn’t work but somehow does. Taking as its cue the ubiquity of spam on the British menu post World War 2, the Pythons concoct a skit lodging in the memory banks. Given how often the word is mentioned, it is not surprising that the modern, the digital meaning of ‘spam’ is indeed derived from this sketch.

Fourth-wall-smashing and self-reflexive, Spam sees two would-be diners lowered by wires into the Green Midget Café – surreally patronized by Vikings – and greeted with a menu dominated by spam. Like a dream, the skit sees the Vikings break into a chorus of “spam, spam, spam, …, spammity spam, wonderful spam” before Palin’s historian first analyses their actions and himself is drawn into the relentless, ear-worm chorus.

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The history of Monty Python games

For something completely different, let’s discuss about Monty Python’s unlikely foray into videogame.

On TV, on film and on stage, Monty Python’s Flying Circus was always one of the greatest things to have ever happened to the world of entertainment.

However, on games machines… not so much, as this peculiar history shows.

Monty Python’s Flying Circus

Back in the days of the Amiga, one of the best games machines ever made, there was a Monty Python game.

Like so many other titles of the era, ostensibly it was a platformer but Flying Circus was much more than that. It was a game that didn’t like any other game. Or sense, for that matter. Who needs sense as you can stop the action for an impromptu tree-identifying course?

Playing part of the game as a chicken, a fish, even a boot, while not actually amazing fun to play, this was a game that really captured the anarchic spirit of the show with the random ‘game over’ announcement still making us laugh.

The 7th Level trilogy

A pair of adventure games and a collection of screensavers and such silliness, developer the 7th Level brought three Monty Python products to the planet, including Complete Waste of Time, the Meaning of Life, and the Quest for the Holy Grail.

They were all well existed. It’s not like any of them were terrible but it’s not like it was extremely worth your time to play or use any of them.

However, we can’t argue with that they had the talent on board.

The Ministry of Silly Games

Launched on Facebook some years ago, the Ministry of Silly Games provided a collection of Flash timewasters with a Pythonesque bent to the world of the social network.

It’s not exactly Farmville, Candy Crush, or that gangster one that everyone used to play, although, is it?

Unluckily, the Ministry of Silly Games was something of a waste of time and effort as well for most involved. In fact, Terry Jones and Terry Gilliam could barely disguise their disregard for the project as interviewed by Eurogamer.

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The most exciting Monty Python’s Flying Circus sketches

Neil Gaiman once claimed that ranking the quality Monty Python sketches was one of the worst things you could make a person do. the second one or 1/3 or fourth of fifth worst element is an sudden Spanish Inquisition, but his claim makes sense after you start picking favorites. Graham Chapman, John Cleese, Eric Idle, Terry Jones, Michael Palin and Terry Gilliam don’t make it smooth.

There are 45 episodes of Monty Python’s Flying Circus, with an amazing wide variety of sketches in keeping with episode. Then there’s the kind of styles: excessive wordplay; brain-melting farce; satirical slap fest; naked absurdity. The chaotic bounce from one to the next makes weighing the first-class in opposition to the quality nearly futile. Plus, figuring out wherein one caricature ends and every other starts is sufficient to make you reach for an aspirin or the dead crab.

With every episode now on Netflix, binge-looking Flying Circus gives a comforting rhythm to the foolishness. You choose up the patterns of television announcers, animal inserts (like a leaping vole), shopkeeper skits, and whilst the fourth wall is set the burst, but their boundless creativity still makes the imagination reel.

MR. HILTER AND THE MINEHEAD by means of-ELECTION
SEASON ONE, EPISODE 12.
Commencing as a nondescript store cartoon with Idle as a direction-obsessed visitor searching for lodging at a B&B, it plummets off the deep quit with the introduction of Cleese sporting a tiny mustache and thick German accent as Mr. Hilter. The way it leans so aggressively into the obviousness of the gag is pure magic, as is Hilter, Bimmler, and Vibbentrop’s lack of ability to forestall revealing who they may be to British simpletons who don’t seem to observe. Come for Cleese ranting in German gibberish at a near-empty lot, stay for Chapman quietly hyping the gang of 1.

 

“POLICE STATION”
SEASON ONE, EPISODE SEVEN
It’s simply Cleese, Jones, and Chapman doing stupid voices for a few minutes, however it’s additionally a gymnastic display of comedian timing. Python pulled off a handful of these stupid linguistic setups (individuals who handiest say the first, center, or final part of words conferences; a guy who speaks in anagrams), however they usually cut before they might overstay their welcome. This, on the other hand, is a shouting, excessive pitched meal in which Jones because the directly man looking to record a burglary is drawn absolutely into the silliness.

 “LIFEBOAT”
SEASON , EPISODE THIRTEEN
The second one season finale went out with a disgusting bang involving an intellectual and gastronomical argument approximately who must eat whom on a lifeboat. Depart it to Python to discover suggestion from a 19th century English court docket case about naval cannibalism. The complete gang discusses who they’d want to devour with such plainness and enthusiasm that you nearly respect the generosity via the laughter, but it is able to’t be separated from the going for walks gag of the episode that that is the night the Queen will be tuning in or from the even nastier comply with-up “Undertakers” comic strip where a impolite Chapman convinces Cleese to eat his lifeless mom.

“SALAD DAYS” – SEASON 3, EPISODE 7
SEASON 3, EPISODE SEVEN
Python slams together the saccharine flavor of a carefree, upper-magnificence musical with the blood-by means of-the-bucket violence of a Sam Peckinpah Western. A candy summer picnic kicks off the laughter, Palin’s stilted enunciation sets the desk (“What a without a doubt first rate day!”) and the computer graphics group covers the entirety in Caro syrup and pink dye. Chapman gets a piano keyboard via the thorax, and absolutely everyone has a jolly exact time.

“FISH LICENCE”
SEASON TWO, EPISODE TEN
What could have been a rehash of “lifeless Parrot” as a substitute presentations a powerful maturity that switches up the roles so that Cleese’s Eric Praline man or woman is the loony with a pet halibut named Eric (in addition to a canine, cat, fruit bat and half-bee with the same call). The caricature simmers, letting Cleese grow an increasing number of ridiculous in protection of his ordinary behavior till it collapses into ornate chaos with a 12-foot-tall Chapman stepping into the scene as the Lord Mayor with full retinue. It receives funnier and funnier and funnier; However it’s additionally a killer test in shape — both Python becoming bored or Python getting even more adventurous

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